Ireland Ferries

Ireland Ferries Passenger and Car Ferry Tickets

Ireland Ferries ticket reservations, ferry timetables and passenger information for Ireland Ferries sailing to and from the Irish ferry ports of Dublin, Cork and Rosslare to Belfast, Cairnryan, Cherbourg, Dun Laoghaire, Fishguard, Holyhead, Isle of Man, Larne, Liverpool, Pembroke, Roscoff, Stranraer, Swansea and Troon.

Booking Ireland Ferries tickets has never been easier, compare all Ireland Ferries prices in real time and book the cheapest available Ireland Ferries tickets to and from the Irish ferry ports of Dublin, Cork and Rosslare to Belfast, Cairnryan, Cherbourg, Dun Laoghaire, Fishguard, Holyhead, Isle of Man, Larne, Liverpool, Pembroke, Roscoff, Stranraer, Swansea and Troon online with instant confirmation.

Travelling by Ireland Ferries is a quick, easy and stress free way to get there and back again. Book your cheap Ireland Ferries tickets to and from the Irish ferry ports of Dublin, Cork and Rosslare to Belfast, Cairnryan, Cherbourg, Dun Laoghaire, Fishguard, Holyhead, Isle of Man, Larne, Liverpool, Pembroke, Roscoff, Stranraer, Swansea and Troon online and enjoy more choice and flexibility.

With the latest Ireland Ferries crossing information and timetables for all sailings to and from the Irish ferry ports of Dublin, Cork and Rosslare to Belfast, Cairnryan, Cherbourg, Dun Laoghaire, Fishguard, Holyhead, Isle of Man, Larne, Liverpool, Pembroke, Roscoff, Stranraer, Swansea and Troon including information on the ferry ports and useful tourist information about the destinations our detailed route and city maps will help you plot your Ireland Ferries ferry journey.

If are travelling to the Irish ferry ports of Dublin, Cork and Rosslare to Belfast, Cairnryan, Cherbourg, Dun Laoghaire, Fishguard, Holyhead, Isle of Man, Larne, Liverpool, Pembroke, Roscoff, Stranraer, Swansea and Troon then book a ferry crossing with Ireland Ferries and arrive at your destination refreshed, relaxed and happy.

Ireland Ferries offers fantastic fares to and from the Irish ferry ports of Dublin, Cork and Rosslare to Belfast, Cairnryan, Cherbourg, Dun Laoghaire, Fishguard, Holyhead, Isle of Man, Larne, Liverpool, Pembroke, Roscoff, Stranraer, Swansea and Troon ferry ports.

IRELAND FERRIES - Ireland Passenger and Car Ferry Tickets

FerryTO offers cheap cross channel car and passenger ferry ticket reservations to and from Ireland with real time ferry ticket price comparison. You always get the cheapest available Ireland ferry ticket price when booking online at FerryTO - and that's a guarantee.
4.8 stars - based on 347 reviews
Compare, book and pay less for Ireland ferry tickets at www.ferryto.be
Google Custom Search
 

Ireland Ferry
Ticket Prices & Reservations


Book Ireland Ferry tickets
to and from the Irish ferry ports of Dublin, Cork and Rosslare to Belfast, Cairnryan, Cherbourg, Dun Laoghaire, Fishguard, Holyhead, Isle of Man, Larne, Liverpool, Pembroke, Roscoff, Stranraer, Swansea and Troon online in advance to enjoy the cheapest available ferry ticket price to sail with Stena Line, Steam Packet Ferries, P&O Irish Sea Ferries, Celtic Link, Irish Ferries, Brittany Ferries or Fastnet Line.

The price you see is the price you pay. There are no hidden extras or surprises such as added fuel surcharges or booking fees and we do not charge you anything extra for paying with a Visa Electron card. The price we quote you for your selected Ireland Ferries route, onboard accommodation and vehicle type is all you will pay, and that's a promise.

To obtain a Ireland Ferries ticket price and book your ferry ticket securely online please use the real time ferry booking form on the left.

 

More About Ireland

The island of Ireland historically consists of 32 counties, of which six, collectively known as Northern Ireland, have remained as part of the United Kingdom since the rest of Ireland gained independence in 1922.

The name "Ireland" applies to the island as a whole, but in English is also the official name of the independent state.

Perched on the northwest tip of Europe, this is the one place in the world where even time getting lost will be worthwhile.

With ancient myths and legends to uncover, amazing landscapes to explore and locals who will be more than happy to reveal our hidden gems, just go where the island of Ireland takes you. Guaranteed, you'll return home with memories that will last a lifetime!

The Irish culture has taken thousands of years to develop, so cherish every moment of your cultural discovery.

If you go to Ireland in July or August, you can expect reasonably warm weather, longer days and a lively menu of festivals. However, this is peak season, which presents some challenges if you're wanting a bit of solitude.

Irish Countryside


Irish Ferries

Few countries have a tourist image so plagued by cliché as Ireland. From shamrocks and shillelaghs to leprechauns, lovable rogues and forty shades of green, there’s a plethora of platitudes to wade through before you scramble ashore on the real Ireland.

The Irish Sea enjoys one of the best serviced and most competitive passenger, car and freight ferry services in Europe.

A surprisingly wide choice of routes are operated by Stena Line, Steam Packet Ferries, P&O Irish Sea Ferries, Celtic Link, Irish Ferries, Brittany Ferries and Fastnet Line link Ireland with mainland UK and France across the Irish Sea.

Holyhead to Dublin: Stena Line run fast services (2 hours) to Dun Loaghaire, 7km south of Dublin, and conventional ferries (3 hours 15 mins) to Dublin itself. Each route has two departures each way daily. Irish Ferries run four crossings each way daily between Holyhead and Dublin. Fast ferry takes 1 hour 55 mins, conventional ferry 3 hours 45 mins.

Douglas (Isle of Man) to Ireland and England: Isle of Man Steam Packet runs services between Douglas and Heysham, Liverpool, Belfast and Dublin.

Pembroke to Rosslare: Stena Line ferries run from Pembroke in south west Wales to Rosslare, Ireland. There are two crossings each way daily, and the journey takes 3 hours 45 minutes.

Ireland Ferry Ports

Fishguard to Rosslare: Stena run fast and conventinal ferries between Fishguard in Pembrokeshire and Rosslare in Wexford, Ireland. There are 4 crossings each way daily in peak season, but Express only runs until 28 September in 2008. Journey times are 2 hours (fast) and 3 hours 30 mins (conventional).

Swansea to Cork: In early June 2009, Fishguard Ferries launched their new Swansea - Cork service with a large, comfortable and reasonably modern ship.

Additional Irish Sea Ferry Crossings:-

Fleetwood to Larne: Fleetwood is just north of Blackpool. This route is operated by Stena, and there are two sailings each way daily in peak season, taking around 8 hours.

Troon, Cairnryan (Scotland) to Larne (Northern Ireland: A busy freight and passenger route operated by P&O Irish Sea Ferries. Fast cat service 1 hour 50 mins Troon To Larne. Conventional ferries 1 hour 45 minutes Cairnryan to Larne. Approx 8 sailings each way daily. Check in 1 hour before departure.

Stranraer to Belfast: Stena operate this route between Scotland and Ireland. Ferries run year-round, and there are typically 6 sailings each way daily. Crossing time is 2 hours on the fast ferry and 3 hours 15 mins on a conventional ferry.

Belfast to Liverpool: DFDS NorfolkLine run a simple timetable on this route: A departure each way at 10.30am and 10.30pm. Large, modern ferries operate this route, and the journey time is about 8 hours.

Rail and Sail

FerryTO also offer a Rail-and-Sail option for foot passengers from anywhere in the UK to Dublin, the price of which includes both discounted train and ferry tickets. For more info please click here.

Entertainment and Activities In Ireland

Many diverse events and festivals take place around the country over the year. The best way to get active in Ireland is to head out into its countryside on foot or cycle. The enchanting landscapes will more than make up for the occasional punishing hill.

Of course, if punishing hills are your thing, there are some great mountain-climbing opportunities. You're also never far from the sea, which will delight scuba divers, sailors and surfers.

  • February sees the Dublin International Film Festival.
  • At Easter many small towns hold parades and townsfolk gorge themselves on chocolate eggs.
  • June 16 is Bloomsday in Dublin, with re-enactments of Ulysses and readings throughout the city. Listowel in County Kerry holds a Writers' Week literary festival during June, and there's a Jazz & Blues Festival in Belfast.
  • July is when marching really gets into its stride in Northern Ireland, and every Orangeman hits the streets on the Glorious 12th to celebrate the Protestant victory at the Battle of the Boyne.
  • August is equestrian month, with the Dublin Horse Show and races in Tralee. Also in county Kerry, at Killorglin, the ancient Puck Fair heralds unrestricted drinking for days and nights.
  • In September, Cork has its Film Festival and Belfast has a Folk Festival.
  • In October, Dublin has its Theatre Festival, Ballinasloe in County Galway hosts the country's largest cattle and horse fair, and Kinsale in County Cork is home to Ireland's gourmet festival.
  • In Wexford the November Opera Festival is an international event.
  • Christmas is a quiet affair in the countryside, though on 26 December the ancient practice of Wren Boys is reenacted, when groups of children, traditional musicians and Irish dancers perform at area homes, asking donations in exchange for a year's worth of good luck.

Visiting Dublin

In the wake of a remarkable economic boom, Dublin's landscape has changed immeasurably over the past decade. These days Dublin ranks among the top tourist destinations in Europe, and this vibrant city hums with a palpable sense that it is creating a new cultural heritage.

The city's burst of prosperity gave it a new confident sheen, but what remains special is the spirit of the people who ensure that, despite whirlwind changes, Dublin remains one of Europe's most down-to-earth, friendly and accessible cities.

Dublin lies on the east coast of Ireland, with Greater Dublin sprawling around the arc of Dublin Bay, bounded to the north by the Howth hills and to the south by the Dalkey headland.

The city is split - physically and psychologically - by the river Liffey; the north has traditionally been poorer and the south wealthier. Two canals - the Grand Canal in the south and the Royal Canal in the north - form semi-circular arcs around the centre.

North of the river, the most important streets for visitors are O'Connell St, the major shopping thoroughfare that leads to Parnell Square, and Gardiner St, a B&B and hostel hotspot.

To the west, the Smithfield area is emerging as a tourist magnet. Busáras, the main bus station, and Connolly station, one of the two main train stations, are near the southern end of Gardiner St.Immediately south of the river is the hub of Dublin, Temple Bar, where you'll find a concentration of pubs, restaurants, shops and a number of art galleries.

Nearby Trinity College is at the southern end of Grafton St, the city's most exclusive shopping street. On the south side you'll also find the best examples of Georgian Dublin, with stately houses and elegant parks.

Eating Out In Dublin

Ireland's largest city is also the nation's culinary capital. From the lowliest greasy-spoon diner serving the kind of deep-fried food that your arteries will resent, to the fanciest Michelin-starred restaurant where eating is a veritable culinary journey, Dublin is a glutton's delight.

Dublin Nights Out

While Dublin's nightlife has been jacked up in recent years and now includes a dizzying roundabout of trendy bars, cafes and clubs, the local pub still exerts a centrifugal pull on fun. The pub is a meeting point for friends and strangers alike, the place where Dubliners are at their most convivial.

Shopping in Dublin

Classy crystal, chunky knitwear and off-beat artefacts. If it's made in Ireland, you can probably buy it in Dublin. Traditional buys include Irish knitwear, Celtic-style jewellery, crystal, fine china and linen. But there are also loads of small shops selling eccentric and offbeat wares and your souvenir trinket doesn't have to be staid.

Activities in Dublin

Outdoor exertions are surprisingly popular in this sodden city. For the literarily inclined, retracing Leopold Bloom's illustrious journey across the city is a must, but even just walking around town for pleasure is a joy. The hardier can try swimming or pit their wits against Irish fish.

  • Walking - Dublin is a lovely, ancient and compact city, so it's no surprise that it features many great walking tours. Beautiful parks, history-rich suburbs and some of the best Georgian architecture in the world make for dreamy scenery.

  • Swimming - If you can take the goose-pimpling temperatures there are some beaches, such as the nearby Sutton, to dip your toe in; or you can do as Buck Mulligan did and swim in the Forty Foot Pool at Dun Laoghaire.

  • Fishing - Fishing is enormously popular, and the coastal areas of Howth and Dun Laoghaire are great sea-fishing spots. Amazingly, the river Liffey has fair salmon fishing, and trout almost jump onto your line near Clane, 20km (12mi) from the city centre.

  • Sleeping - Dublin's downtown ritziness dilutes as you head out to the affordable 'burbs. But the city's weekend popularity can make finding a bed pretty tough in any price range, particularly in summer. Making a reservation will make life much easier.

Places To See / Visit In Dublin

Though most people don't schedule too much gallery time into the pub crawl, Dublin museums offer a wealth of collectables. From the proverbial pot of Irish gold to the artistic riches of the Book of Kells to a host of quirky 'objets d'religious', it's a city of archives and artefacts. Unlike London many of the best places to visit have free entry to all visitors.

 

  • Trinity College
    College Green Call for info: (01) 677 294107:00-24:00
    Ireland's premier university is both a tranquil retreat from the bustle of the city and the home of Dublin's biggest attraction, the Book of Kells. Established by staunchly Protestant Elizabeth I in 1592 in an effort to stop 'popery', the university's ancient ivy-covered walls crawl with history and a sense of occasion.
    Admission: concession 6.50 full 7.50 family 15.00St Patrick's Cathedral
    St Patrick's Close Call for info: (01) 475 4817Mar-Oct 09:00-18:00; Nov-Feb Mon-Fri 09:00-18:00, Sat 09:00-17:00, Sun 09:00-15:00

  • St Patrick's Cathedral stands on one of Dublin's earliest Christian sites. St Patrick is said to have baptised converts at a well within the cathedral grounds. Although a church stood on the site from the 5th century, the present building dates from 1191, and several major alterations have been made since then.
    Admission: concession 3.20 full 4.20 family 9.50

  • James Joyce Museum
    Call for info: (01) 280 9265Apr-Oct Mon-Sat 10:00-13:00, 14:00-17:00, Sun 14:00-18:00
    Housed inside a Martello tower that overlooks Dublin Bay, the James Joyce Museum combines memorabilia from throughout the celebrated writer's life with a dramatic setting that has a story all its own.
    Admission: family €17.50 full €6.25 child €3.75

  • National Gallery of Ireland
    Merrion Sq West Call for info: (01) 661 5133Mon-Wed & Fri-Sat 09:30-17:30, Thu 09:30-20:30, Sun 12:00-17:30
    The National Gallery opened in 1864 and has built up a sizeable holding of Irish, British and European art. Its collection has grown, mainly through bequests, to around 12,500 artworks, including oils, watercolours, drawings, paints and sculptures.
    Admission: free

  • National Museum of Ireland - Archaeology & History
    Kildare St Call for info: (01) 677 7444Tue-Sat 10:00-17:00, Sun 14:00-17:00
    The National Museum is home to a fabulous bounty of Bronze Age gold, Iron Age Celtic metalwork, Viking artefacts and impressive ancient Egyptian relics. The Palladian-style Victorian building is a fine setting for the collection, with its 18m (62ft) domed rotunda, marble columns and mosaic floors.
    Admission: free

  • Guinness Storehouse
    James St Call for info: (01) 408 480009:30-17:00
    Like a Disneyland for beer lovers, the Guinness Storehouse is an all-singing, all-dancing extravaganza combining sophisticated exhibits with more than a pintful of marketing hype. The best part of the Storehouse tour is the rooftop Gravity Bar, where you can kick back with a pint of the black stuff.
    Admission: child €5.00 concession €9.00 full €13.50 family €30.00

  • Dublin Castle
    Dame St Call for info: (01) 677 7129Mon-Fri 10:00-17:00, Sat-Sun 14:00-17:00
    The centre of British power in Ireland, built on the orders of King John in the early 13th century, Dublin Castle is more correctly described as a palace. Of the original Anglo-Norman fortress built on the Viking foundations, only the Record Tower remains. The most fascinating part of the castle is underground – a chunk of the old city walls and moat.
    Admission: full €4.00 concession €3.00

  • Christ Church Cathedral
    Christchurch Pl Call for info: (01) 677 809909:45-17:00
    Dublin's most imposing church, Christ Church, lies within the old heart of medieval Dublin. Built on the site of an existing wooden Viking church, the stone cathedral was commissioned in 1172 by the Anglo-Norman conqueror of Dublin, Richard de Clare ('Strongbow') and Archbishop Laurence O'Toole.
    Admission: concession €2.50 full €5.00 family €7.00

  • National Museum of Ireland - Natural History
    Merrion St Call for info: (01) 677 7444Tue-Sat 10:00-17:00, Sun 14:00-17:00
    This museum has scarcely changed since 1857, when Scottish explorer Dr David Livingstone delivered the inaugural lecture. The creaking interior gives way to an overwhelming display of stuffed animals and mounted heads, crammed in like something from a Hitchcock movie. Of the two million species on display in the museum, many are long extinct.
    Admission: free

  • Chester Beatty Library
    Ship St Call for info: (01) 407 0750Mon-Fri 10:00-17:00, Sat 11:00-17:00, Sun 13:00-17:00
    The astounding collection of New York mining magnate Sir Alfred Chester Beatty is the basis for one of Dublin's best, if less-visited, museums. An avid traveller and collector, Beatty amassed more than 20,000 manuscripts, rare books, miniature paintings, clay tablets, costumes and other objects d'art.
    Admission: free

 


Best available Ireland ferry ticket price guarantee

Best Ireland Ferry Ticket Price Guarantee

Best Price Guarantee - We always offer you our lowest available DFDS Seaways, Stena Line or P&O passenger and car ferries ticket price to and from Ireland. There are no hidden extras or surprises such as added fuel surcharges or booking fees and we also we do not charge you anything extra for paying with a Visa Electron card. The price we quote for your selected Ireland ferry ticket, onboard accommodation and vehicle type is all you will pay, and that's a promise!

In the unlikely event you find the same all inclusive Ireland ferry ticket cheaper in the brochure of any other tour operator we promise that we will do our best to beat that price or offer you the choice of requesting a refund. To book Ireland car and passenger ferry tickets please click here.

 

Click Here to contact the Ireland Ferries customer care team at ferryto.be

Customer Care, Telesales & Contact Us

At FerryTO you are able to obtain live Ireland ferry ticket prices, check availability and book car and passenger ferry tickets to and from Ireland at our lowest available ticket price.

Ferryto.co.uk is part of the world's largest online ferry ticket distribution network providing the ability to book over 80 major European ferry operators including to Ireland and to over 1,200 other ferry routes throughout the UK, France, Spain, Ireland, Holland, Eastern Europe, the Mediterranean, the Baltic and North Africa.

For more information, answers to frequently asked questions or to contact us directly please click here.